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Top 10 Cementless Total Hip Replacement Doctors in Delhi NCR

Overview

Cementless total hip replacement surgery involves using prosthetic components that encourage bone integration without cement. This technique can promote long-term stability and reduce the risk of implant loosening.

Why Would Someone Need to Have Cementless Total Hip Replacement Surgery?

Cementless total hip replacement is preferred for patients with good bone quality, as it encourages natural bone ingrowth onto the implant surface. This method is suitable for younger, active individuals, reducing the risk of long-term complications such as loosening, and promoting a more durable and stable hip joint.

Conditions that can require Cementless Total Hip Replacement Surgery

  • Osteoarthritis: Severe hip joint degeneration.

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis: Chronic inflammatory joint disease.

  • Avascular Necrosis: Loss of blood supply to the hip bone.

  • Post-Traumatic Arthritis: Arthritis following hip injury.

  • Young, Active Patients: Preferable for long-term durability in individuals with good bone quality.

Requirements & Evaluation for Cementless Total Hip Replacement Surgery

To be a candidate for cementless total hip replacement surgery, patients typically need good bone quality and overall health. Evaluation involves assessing hip joint damage due to conditions like osteoarthritis or avascular necrosis. The surgeon considers age, activity level, and medical history. Preoperative testing ensures the patient can tolerate surgery. Imaging, such as X-rays or MRIs, helps determine the extent of joint damage. Surgeons may also assess bone density. The decision for surgery is collaborative, involving the patient, surgeon, and medical team, to achieve optimal outcomes for long-term hip joint function and stability.

Different Types of Cementless Total Hip Replacement Surgery

  • Direct Anterior Approach (DAA):

One variation of cementless total hip replacement surgery involves adopting a direct anterior approach (DAA). This technique entails accessing the hip joint from the front of the body. By doing so, surgeons can minimize muscle damage, potentially resulting in a faster and less painful recovery for the patient.

  • Ceramic-on-Ceramic Implants:

  • In certain cementless hip replacements, surgeons may opt for ceramic-on-ceramic implants. These implants utilize ceramic materials for both the femoral head and the acetabular socket. This combination offers advantages such as reduced wear rates and increased durability compared to some other materials.

  • Metal-on-Highly Crosslinked Polyethylene (XLPE) Implants:

Another type involves the use of metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) implants. This design combines a metal femoral head with a socket made of highly crosslinked polyethylene. This combination aims to minimize wear and tear on the joint and improve the overall longevity of the implant.

  • Dual Mobility Implants: Dual mobility implants represent a different category, featuring an additional bearing surface. This design enhances stability, reducing the risk of dislocation. This can be particularly beneficial for patients concerned about the potential for hip joint dislocation following surgery.

These various types of cementless total hip replacement surgeries provide surgeons with options to tailor the procedure based on individual patient characteristics, preferences, and specific medical considerations. The choice of approach and implant type is often made collaboratively between the patient and the surgical team.

Procedure for Cementless Total Hip Replacement Surgery

Before the Procedure:

Consultation:

  • Patient evaluation, medical history review, and discussion of hip pain and limitations.

  • Imaging studies, such as X-rays or MRIs, to assess joint damage.

Preoperative Testing:

  • Blood tests, electrocardiogram (ECG), and other assessments to ensure surgical fitness.

  • Discussion of potential risks and benefits.

Preparation:

  • Instructions on pre-surgery lifestyle adjustments, medications, and fasting.

After the Procedure:

Recovery Room:

Monitored for initial recovery and pain management.

  • Physical Therapy:

  • Rehabilitation begins, including exercises to promote mobility and strength.

Hospital Stay:

  • Typically 1-4 days, depending on individual progress.

Follow-up Care:

  • Regular postoperative check-ups to monitor healing and address concerns.

Return to Activities:

  • Gradual resumption of normal activities under the guidance of the medical team.

Long-term Follow-up:

  • Periodic follow-ups to assess long-term outcomes and address any issues.

Risks and Benefits

Risks

Infection:

  • Risk of postoperative infection, which may require antibiotic treatment or revision surgery.

Blood Clots:

  • Potential for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism.

Dislocation:

  • Risk of hip joint dislocation, especially in the early postoperative period.

Implant Loosening:

  • Though less common, there is a risk of the implant not integrating properly with the bone.

Nerve or Blood Vessel Damage:

  • Possibility of injury to nearby nerves or blood vessels during surgery.

Benefits of Cementless Total Hip Replacement Surgery:

Reduced Wear and Tear:

  • Cementless implants may lead to less wear and tear over time, potentially increasing longevity.

Quicker Recovery:

  • Minimal trauma to muscles and tissues can result in a faster recovery compared to cemented techniques.

Stability and Range of Motion:

  • Improved stability and range of motion, enhancing overall joint function.

Lower Risk of Allergic Reactions:

  • Reduced risk of allergic reactions to cement materials.

Suitable for Young, Active Patients:

  • Often preferred for individuals with good bone quality and an active lifestyle.

Recovery:

After cementless total hip replacement, immediate postoperative care includes pain management and monitoring in the recovery room. Physical therapy begins promptly, focusing on mobility and strength. Hospital stay ranges from 1 to 4 days, with gradual resumption of activities, driving restrictions, and long-term follow-up appointments to monitor progress and address concerns.

Recovery timelines can vary, and adherence to rehabilitation protocols is crucial for optimal outcomes. Individual progress depends on factors such as overall health, adherence to postoperative instructions, and the extent of pre-surgical joint damage. Patients should communicate openly with their healthcare team throughout the recovery process.

4 Whys

Why Cementless Total Hip Replacement (THR) Surgery?

    Ease pain
    Better life quality
    Painless mobility

Why Overseas?

    More options
    Advanced technology
    Affordable

Why Advance Treatment?

    Minimally invasive
    No pain
    Quick recovery

Why Yapita Health?

    Robotic knee surgery
    Experienced orthopedic surgeons
    Patient Success stories

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Treatment Related Information

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Surgical Procedure of Cemented THR Surgery :

  • Anesthesia: The patient is placed under general anesthesia or a combination of general and regional anesthesia.

  • Incision: An incision is made to access the hip joint.

  • Femoral Component Placement: The damaged femoral head is removed, and a metal or ceramic femoral component is inserted into the hollow space of the femur.

  • Acetabular Component Placement: The damaged socket (acetabulum) is prepared, and the acetabular component, often lined with high-density polyethylene or ceramic, is secured in place.

  • Bone Cement Application: Bone cement is applied to both the femoral and acetabular components to create a stable bond with the surrounding bone.

  • Closing the Incision: The incision is closed using sutures or staples.

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Cemented THR Surgery Recovery and Rehabilitation:

  • Hospital Stay: Patients typically stay in the hospital for a few days, depending on individual recovery progress.

  • Weight-Bearing: Weight-bearing on the operated hip is gradually allowed under the guidance of physical therapists.

  • Physical Therapy: Rehabilitation focuses on regaining strength, flexibility, and mobility. Patients are guided through exercises to enhance joint function.

  • Assistive Devices: Crutches or a walker may be used initially and gradually phased out as mobility improves.

  • Home Exercises: Patients are often provided with home exercises to continue rehabilitation.

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Cemented THR Surgery Risks and Complications:

While cemented THR surgery is generally considered safe, there are potential risks and complications. Common risks include infection, blood clots, dislocation of the implant, and complications related to anesthesia. There is also a slight risk of cement-related complications, such as cement leakage into the bloodstream.

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Longevity of Implants:

Cemented THR implants are designed to last for many years, often exceeding 15 to 20 years. The lifespan can be influenced by factors such as the patient's age, activity level, and the type of implant used.

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Cementless Total Hip Replacement (THR) Surgery cost

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Cementless Total Hip Replacement (THR) Surgery cost

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Cementless Total Hip Replacement (THR) Surgery At Yapita Health

We offer top-quality medical tourism services to help patients like you receive the best treatment abroad. With our team of experienced doctors and state-of-the-art facilities, you can trust us to provide you with exceptional care and support throughout your journey. Our dedicated team of medical professionals will be with you every step of the way, ensuring your journey to recovery is as smooth and successful as possible.

FAQs Related to Cementless Total Hip Replacement (THR) Surgery

Why is Cemented THR Performed?

Cemented THR is often performed when the patient has weaker bone quality, osteoporosis, or compromised bone density, making it challenging for the bone to provide sufficient support for the implants. The use of cement enhances the stability of the artificial joint.


How Long Does Cemented THR Surgery Take?

The duration of Cemented THR surgery typically ranges from 1 to 2 hours. The actual time may vary based on factors such as the patient's anatomy and the complexity of the procedure.


What materials are used in Cemented THR Implants?

The femoral component is commonly made of metal alloys such as cobalt-chromium or titanium, while the acetabular component is often lined with high-density polyethylene or ceramic.


How Long is the Recovery Period for Cemented THR?

Recovery times vary among individuals, but most patients can resume normal daily activities within a few weeks. Full recovery, including the return to more strenuous activities, may take several months.


Can I Drive After Cemented THR Surgery?

The ability to drive depends on factors such as the type of anesthesia used, the side of the hip replaced, and the individual's overall recovery progress. Driving is usually resumed when the patient can safely control the vehicle.


What Are the Risks Associated with Cemented THR?

Common risks include infection, blood clots, dislocation of the implant, and complications related to anesthesia. There is also a slight risk of cement-related complications, such as cement leakage into the bloodstream.


How Long Do Cemented THR Implants Last?

Cemented THR implants are designed to last for many years, often exceeding 15 to 20 years. The longevity can be influenced by factors such as the patient's age, activity level, and the type of implant used.


Can I Engage in Physical Activities After Cemented THR?

Most patients can gradually resume low-impact activities and even some sports after recovery. However, high-impact activities may need to be avoided or approached cautiously.


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